Mandala Stones DIY

Mandala Stones DIY


Mandala Stones are the latest trend in the craft world to go viral. The colorfully dotted patterns are a real eyecatcher and easy to recreate. By now you can admire a great many of different patterns and interpretations of Mandala Stones all over the internet. The great thing about it is, that you can do them without a lot of practice. You don’t need special skills or be an amazingly talented painter to get great results. It is not so hard to paint dots. With some simple tips and tricks you get the hang of it in no time!

Here you can find a gallery with a lot of beautiful Mandala Stones. Maybe you find some inspiration there to make some stones yourself. πŸ™‚ For a simple step-by-step tutorial on a beautiful basic Mandala Stone, just scroll down this entry.

Colors and Brushes:

You can use a lot of different paints to make Mandala Stones. Personally I prefer to use acrylic paint (available here*) thinned out with water or Pelikan Plaka (available here*). The most important thing is the right consistency of the paint. If the paint is too thick or pasty, you need to add more water.

Test: Let some paint drop on a piece of paper. The paint should be liquid enough to form a rounded shape on its own. If the paint is too thick, it is very hard to draw fine details or steady lines.

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

Choosing the right paintbrush is equally important for nice results! For this type of craft you should use pointed round brushes with synthetic bristles (available here*). Those kind of brushes work best with acrylic paint. The synthetic bristles are firm enough to paint small details and give you maximum control.

Paintbrushes with animal hair are not really suitable for painting Mandala Stones with acrylic paint. The bristles are too soft for patterns like that. Also the tip of the brush can be too fringy for details.

If you are shopping for paintbrushes look out for brushes with yellow or artificially white bristles. This often is a good indicator for synthetic or nylon hair. The tip should be pointed and the diameter of the bristles should be rounded. For small details I recommend size 0 and size 2 for bigger dots. (Both brushes can bee seen on the left side in the picture above.) (available here*).

Heads Up: Sometimes paintbrushes have a pointed tip when you buy them but loose their shape with the first wash. That is because the bristles are dipped in starch and dried like that to protect the shape until you use them. You can see one example of that in the middle of the picture above. Take a good look at the bristles before you buy a brush. The bristles should not stick together. If they do, they are dipped in starch and the tip will become fringy once you use your brush.

Alternative Brushes / Tools: Sometimes good brushes can be hard to come by. I got a great tip from Cindy (who painted some beautiful mandala stones herself. You should check out her blog! Link >> ), that you can also use nail art bruhes (available here*)! Some people find it easier to create small details (like the white dots) with dotting tools (available here*).  I think that is an amazing tip! If you are struggling with normal brushes, you should give this a try!

Do you have any more tips? Let me know in the comments! πŸ™‚

The Stones:

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

You can find suitable stones on a stony beach or a gravel bar. The surface of those stones is really smooth and perfect to paint on.

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

Rounded, flattened stones work best for Mandala patterns. Before you start with your artwork, clean your stones with some soapy water. You don’t need to apply an undercoat or a layer of transparent varnish, but it can make the painting process easier. (I never do, but that’s because I am too lazy for that and want to start right away.)

Easy Mandala Stone Tutorial:

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

To enhance the colors of the Mandala pattern use a dark color (in this case black) to paint a rounded shape. Take your time with the shape and try to make it as evenly as possible. Leave a bit of space to the sides of the stone, because the Mandala itself will be larger than the dark undercoat.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

You start this type pf Mandala pattern always in the center. Wait until the dark color has dried sufficiently and paint a big, white dot exactly in the center. (Obviously you can use different colors for this pattern.)

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

Now you start with the first row. Circle the big dot with a lot of small, white dots. The pattern will look prettiest if all the dots of one row are the same size and are evenly placed.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

Start the second row of dots with the lightest color of your gradient. Place the dots between the dots of the previous row. It is important for later to leave a small gap between all the dots of one row.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

The dots should get bigger and a little darker with each row.

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

I chose a purple gradient for this pattern. The lightest color should be really light. Add one or two drops of a darker color to the paint for each new row. It is important to save a small amount of each shade for later.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

The gaps between the dots should also get slightly bigger with each row.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

Paint the dots of the second last row close to the edge of your undercoat. If you run out of undercoat in some places, just reapply a little of the dark color to even out the shape.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

Paint the dots of your last row halfway across the edge of your dark undercoat.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

Now you can fill in the little gaps between the bigger dots with small, white dots. (Skip the first and the last row.) Use your smallest paintbrush.

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

To enhance the gradient effect and to add some depth to the pattern, paint smaller dots on the colored dots of each row. Choose always the shade of the previous row for that, as indicated in the picture. (Skip the first row again.) If the contrast between the shades is too small, add a bit of white paint to each shade.

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

You can add little details to the edge of your pattern. The easiest way to do that is a straight line of different sized dots. Start with a bigger one followed by three smaller ones. Keep an eye on the center of your pattern and imagine a straight line to the edge. Follow the line when you add small details to avoid wonky shapes.

Mandala Stones DIY Tutorial

You can go on as long as you want. I added a bright colored dot in the middle and small dots on the outside. Just do want you think looks nice to balance everything out. πŸ™‚

Add a finishing layer of transparent spray paint if you want. 

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

Mandala Stone Pattern Overview

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

The finished Mandala Stone will look something like that. Of course you don’t have to use the exact same colors I used. Be creative and experiment with different colors and shapes. Mandala Stone Painting can be a kind of meditation. Just let the pattern form itself.

 

For Pinterest:

DIY Mandala Stones Tutorial by colorful-crafts.com

Mandala Stones DIY

 

*This blog post contains affiliate links. You can read all about them on my disclosure page. Link >>

35 Comments

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  1. Sabrina

    i just recently started rock painting, now I find myself painting all times of the night and early morning, I wake up thinking about it, it’s very therapeutic , each of my rocks tell a story, I love it.. Thank you for sharing your expertise✌🏾️!

  2. Christina

    How in the heck do you get all of the circles so perfect? I tried and it was very hard. Making a dot with something is one thing, but painting tiny , perfect circles is not easy. Is it just the brushes, or am I an idiot, have you painted 1,000 of these??? ; )

    • Barbara

      It is definitly a lot of practice in my case. But I would say, that the right brush is the most important thing! (Also the consistency of the paint is crucial. Not too thick, not too runny) You can do it! πŸ™‚

  3. Robin

    Thank you so much for this tutorial! I’ve wanted to paint a Mandala rock for a while but haven’t known exactly how to start. Your tutorial makes the process so much easier to tackle!

  4. Kit

    I don’t use a paintbrush. I use ‘dotting tools’ which I use in my nail business. The dotting tools are different size dots. It works well.

  5. Lizzy

    Hello. I’m interested in getting started. However, I have to order all the paints and brushes online. While you amazon links are helpful, they are no longer valid. Would you kindly update your links?

    • Barbara

      Hello! Thank you for bringing that to my attention! πŸ™‚ I updated the links and also added some alternative brushes and tools you could use. I hope this is helpful to you!

  6. Anon

    This is brilliant – thank you! One quick question – if you make a mistake, is there a way to fix it? Or do I have to start over…(groan!)

    • Barbara

      Thank you! πŸ™‚ You have a little playtime before the acrylic paint dries. So you can fix mistakes with a wet cotton bud or just paint over it again. I do that all the time!

  7. Judy

    What a fabulous look, I love this. Thank you for sharing and teaching us with these step by step instructions. I want to give this a try. One can not have to many hobbies.

  8. James Bergman

    Thanks for the tip about using acrylic paint on rocks. I doubt that I would be able to recreate a pattern like yours unless I bought it online. However, my kids love painting rocks. One of the things we like to do is to paint them like the vegetables in our garden, and then we use them as garden markers.

  9. Laura

    I haven’t tried these yet but have a few tips from years in painting ceramics. For a quick sealer use cheap hair spray. Works fine. Keeps paint sealed.
    For Tiny uniform dots, turn the paintbrush around and use the other end, also bamboo skewers, toothpicks, just use a light touch to keep from leaving a (dent) in the center. Practice on paper plates. Also after washing your brushes make sure to shape them while wet to keep that pointy tip. I’m old school I always used my mouth…lol but fingers will work

  10. Barb

    LOVE this! This is just the info I needed! I’ve been wanting to make mandala rocks for a while but wasn’t sure where to start! Thank you! πŸ™‚

  11. Judy

    Thank you so very much for sharing your talent with all of us and teaching us step by step. I have a rare terminal illness and I am bedfast a lot of the time. Now, you have opened a new fun thing in my world. My husband made me a “breakfast type,” tray in which I can place my paints in the side and with a nice Ott light I have I pass many hours brightened up by you. I can’t thank you enough!

    • Barbara

      Hi Judy! Thank you for your lovely comment! I’m so glad that this tutorial is of help to you. Creating those stones is so addictive! I would love to see some of your results. You can always send pictures to Barbara@colorful-crafts.com if you like. πŸ™‚

  12. Nicolas

    Hello Barbara,
    Excellent and creative works with Mandala Stone.
    You just impressed me and my young daughter.
    I was looking this mandala stone in local stone mason warehouse though i did not get that. Is there nay alternative name for this stones?
    Highly appreciated your contributions.
    Cheers

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